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20121108
20121116
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WUSA (CBS) 6
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CBS
Nov 8, 2012 6:30pm EST
brush head cleans in three directions with up to 50% more brush movements than leading sonic technology. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. [ male announcer ] why do more emergency workers everywhere trust duracell...?? [ male announcer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> pelley: president obama will visit burma this month, the first for an american president. burma, in southeast asia, has been ruled by a military dictatorship for 50 years, but recently it's taken steps toward democracy and the president's trip is a reward for that. the pakistani school girl who stood up to the taliban is making a recovery in i had british hospital. these are new pictures of 15-year-old malala yousufzai reading some of the get well cards that have pored in. malala was shot in the head last month after speaking out for girls' education. her father said she will not be s
CBS
Nov 11, 2012 6:00pm EST
the quantum leap in weapons technology between then and now. as the president pointed out in the debates, no other country comes close. >> we spend more on our military than the next ten countries combined. china, russia, france, the united kingdom, you name it next test-- . >> reporter: sequestration would not change that according to the center for strategic and budgetary assessment it is not the size of the cuts, about $50 billion a year that would be so damaging but the fact that they would be across-the-board. panetta adds that except for military pay every program from the joint strike fight tore military band was be cut by the same amount, 23%. >> it's absolutely a foolish thing to do. if you want to cut the defense budget that's fine. this is a foolish way to do it. >> reporter: in other words, if the pentagon were allowed to pick and choose its cuts sequestration might not be the disaster secretary panetta is predicting. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. >> jeff: pentagon contractors aren't the only one in with a stake in this debate. 120,000 small contractors take part in t
CBS
Nov 15, 2012 7:00am EST
technology that the government wants in every car in the country. >> but we begin this morning with a look at today's eye opener, your world in 90 seconds. >>> when they go after the u.n. ambassador apparently because they think she's an easy target, then they got a problem. >> president obama fires back at republican critics. >> the controversy over susan rice calling the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi spontaneous has reached a boiling point. after republicans threaten to block her possible nomination for secretary of state. >> the president thinks we are picking on people, he really does not have any idea of how serious this issue is. >> if senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody they should go after me. >> david petraeus will be on capitol hill tomorrow to testify about the september 11th attacks on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. >> we now know the identity of the fbi agent who triggered the investigation into the petraeus affair. >> three people have been killed ter rockets were fired into southern israel from gaza. the first isra
CBS
Nov 11, 2012 9:00am EST
. >> reporter: until years later technology made day to night possible. >> you know, you can just see the way the light moves. it's pretty exciting. i love when the lights come up, you know. >> reporter: remember central park in the fall? back at his studio in connecticut, the first thing steven wilkes has to do is decide literally where to draw the line. where day ends and night will begin. in the final print. >> you can actually see it as time changes. >> reporter: the next step is to look at everyone of the images he shot, collect his favorites and then digitally fit them together like puzzle pieces. you could go blind looking at 1400 of those. >> you're looking for some small, tiny nuanced detail. >> reporter: like the brides. the brides started to evolve. i mean basically i saw one in the morning. midday. i mean they literally were showing up all day long. >> reporter: here they all are in the finished photograph. >> it was really kind of a moment like a where's waldo. as i ket shooting i kept noticing another bride here. >> reporter: what took that one october day to shoot took four mon
CBS
Nov 11, 2012 7:00pm EST
, the challenge is retraining people already on the job to keep up with advances in technology. alcoa is one of the largest and oldest companies in america. it's been hiring skilled workers since 1888, and today has factories around the globe. at its aerospace plant in whitehall, michigan, 2,100 employees are working three shifts a day, seven days a week. german-born c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld says alcoa's competitive edge is innovation, backed up by a skilled workforce. they're producing parts that make jet engines 50% more fuel efficient. >> klaus kleinfeld: i would love to show you how the air flow goes inside. but that's part of probably the best-kept secret that this industry has. that's the innovation i'm talking about. >> pitts: and a person just can't walk off the street and put that together for you. >> kleinfeld: impossible. >> pitts: kari belanger came to alcoa with an engineering degree. the company trained her to program robots to do the work that, 50 years ago, was done by hand. alcoa also helped pay for rod coley to go back to school and get his engineering degree. he x-rays parts
CBS
Nov 13, 2012 7:00am EST
technology? >> and i think they are. i think what's interesting is the more engagement you see in the palm of your hand, you realize that's an opportunity we're all going after. >> i know mark zuckerberg tried to hire you in 2006. are you sorry you turned him down? >> it was one of the mistakes i made. i feel very lucky to have been part of many companies and i got to see interesting companies grow, everything from twitter to facebook to google, and for me, it's really about knowing the smartest people in the world, because i feel like i get to learn more from them. >> and now you get the chance to meet charlie and gayle. >> exactly. >> nick faldo won the masters and the british open three times each. he'll talk this morning of building a perfect golf swing and why tiger woods hasn't won a major title in four years. that's next right here on "cbs this morning." >>> who loves golf? we do. cbs sports golf analyst nick faldo won six grand slam titles in his career. his how-to book for golfers, "a swing for life" has just been updated and rereleased. >> it marks the 25th anniversary of his fir
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6